Swimming Game – Splash and Dash

Here is a swimming game for a guppies ?

Name

Splash and Dash

Core Skill

This game helps toddlers to practice their kicking and breathing skills in the water.

Who

This game is suitable for guppies level swimmers, who are toddlers aged 3 to 5 years old. They should be able to float on their backs and fronts with assistance, and blow bubbles in the water. They should wear lifejackets for safety and comfort.

What

This game is a fun and exciting race where toddlers have to kick their legs and splash the water as fast as they can. They have to follow the instructor’s commands and directions, and try to reach the finish line before the others.

How

The instructor should divide the toddlers into two or more teams, depending on the size of the pool and the number of participants. The instructor should assign each team a color or a name, and give them a matching toy or a flag to hold. The instructor should then line up the teams at one end of the pool, facing the opposite end. The instructor should explain the rules of the game and demonstrate how to kick and splash the water.

The rules of the game are:

  • The instructor will say “Ready, set, go!” and blow a whistle to start the race.
  • The toddlers have to kick their legs and splash the water as fast as they can, while holding their toy or flag with one hand.
  • The toddlers have to follow the instructor’s commands and directions, such as “Go left!”, “Go right!”, “Go straight!”, or “Stop!”.
  • The toddlers have to breathe by lifting their heads out of the water and blowing bubbles when they go back in.
  • The first team to reach the finish line at the other end of the pool wins the race.

The instructor should cheer and encourage the toddlers throughout the game, and praise them for their efforts and achievements. The instructor should also monitor the toddlers’ safety and comfort, and adjust the difficulty and duration of the game according to their abilities and needs.

Difficulties the instructor may face

Some difficulties that the instructor may face while conducting this game are:

  • Some toddlers may be scared or reluctant to kick and splash the water, especially if they are not used to it or if they have sensitive eyes or ears.
  • Some toddlers may not be able to follow the instructor’s commands and directions, either because they cannot hear them clearly or because they get distracted or confused by other things in the pool.
  • Some toddlers may not be able to breathe properly in the water, either because they forget to lift their heads out of the water or because they inhale water instead of blowing bubbles.
  • Some toddlers may get tired or bored of kicking and splashing the water, especially if the game is too long or too repetitive.

To overcome these difficulties, the instructor should:

  • Use positive reinforcement and gentle persuasion to motivate and reassure the toddlers who are scared or reluctant to kick and splash the water. The instructor should also use toys, songs, or stories to make the game more fun and engaging for them.
  • Use clear and simple language and gestures to communicate with the toddlers who are not able to follow the instructor’s commands and directions. The instructor should also repeat or rephrase them if necessary, and check if they understand them correctly.
  • Use demonstrations and reminders to teach and reinforce the toddlers who are not able to breathe properly in the water. The instructor should also help them if they choke or cough, and make sure they are comfortable and safe in the water.
  • Use variations and challenges to keep the interest and excitement of the toddlers who get tired or bored of kicking and splashing the water. The instructor should also change the teams, distances, speeds, or directions of the game if necessary, and make sure they are appropriate for their level.

Better swimming.
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